乳色吐息

乳色吐息

Monday, August 5, 2013

Driver injures 12 at LA beach boardwalk, flees

乳色吐息In this image take from a security camera, pedestrians scatter as a car drives through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. At least a dozen people were injured, two of them critically, according to police. (AP Photo/Snapchat)

In this image take from a security camera, pedestrians scatter as a car drives through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. At least a dozen people were injured, two of them critically, according to police. (AP Photo/Snapchat)

In this image take from a security camera, pedestrians scatter as a car drives through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. At least a dozen people were injured, two of them critically, according to police. (AP Photo/Snapchat)

Pedestrians gather as police and fire officials respond after a car drove through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. At least a dozen people were injured, two of them critically, according to police. (AP Photo/Maarten Smitskamp)

An unidentified man looks at a car that came to rest against the entrance of a public restroom after being driven through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. At least a dozen people were injured, two of them critically, according to police. (AP Photo/Maarten Smitskamp)

(AP) ? A car drove into a crowd of people walking along the famed Venice Beach boardwalk early Saturday, injuring a dozen people before the driver fled the busy Los Angeles tourist site.

The driver and sedan had yet to be located more than two hours after the 6 p.m. crash, police Officer Jorge Torres. Police were looking for a dark-colored Dodge Charger or Avenger. The driver was a man described as having sandy blond hair and estimated to be in his mid-20s, authorities said.

Multiple witnesses reported that the driver appeared to be "moving purposefully" and in control of the car as it plowed through the crowd, Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

Firefighters were surveying the sprawling crowd looking for injured, Humphrey said.

Twelve injured had been counted, with 10 of them hospitalized. Two were hurt seriously and two critically, Humphrey said. He had no details on the identities of the victims or their injuries.

The car was still moving as it drove out of sight of firefighters and the people who were hit.

The Venice boardwalk is a cultural hub in a part of Los Angeles known for its eccentricities. It is home to galleries, restaurants, tattoo shops, skateboard parks and the famous outdoor weight room known as Muscle Beach.

Jogger Daniel Regidor was a short distance from the crash when it happened and as he approached he saw "people screaming, running."

"When I came upon the scene, there were a bunch of people on the ground, bloodied," he told the Los Angeles Times. "Some looked pretty mangled, head injuries, just a lot of blood."

Associated Press

Source: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-08-03-Car%20Into%20Beachgoers/id-66b197c46c97433eb5569a2c4d754976

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Egypt says clock ticking on sit-in standoff

FILE - In this Friday, July 5, 2013 file photo, The Muslim Brotherhood's General Guide Mohammed Badie speaks onstage as military helicopters fly overhead before tens of thousands of supporters in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt?s official news agency says the Muslim Brotherhood?s leader, Badie and his powerful deputy, Khairat el-Shater will go on trial Aug 25 for their complicity in and incitement of the killing of eight protesters. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - In this Friday, July 5, 2013 file photo, The Muslim Brotherhood's General Guide Mohammed Badie speaks onstage as military helicopters fly overhead before tens of thousands of supporters in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt?s official news agency says the Muslim Brotherhood?s leader, Badie and his powerful deputy, Khairat el-Shater will go on trial Aug 25 for their complicity in and incitement of the killing of eight protesters. (AP Photo, File)

In this Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012 photo, Muslim Brotherhood nominated deputy leader Khairat el-Shater, listens during an interview with the Associated Press in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt?s official news agency says the Muslim Brotherhood?s leader, Mohammed Badie and his powerful deputy, el-Shater will go on trial Aug 25 for their complicity in and incitement of the killing of eight protesters. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi prays before "Iftar,"the dusk meal when observant Muslims break their day-long fast, during a protest near Cairo University in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Egypt's Interior Ministry warned supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Saturday for a second time to abandon their protest encampments as a senior U.S. diplomat was meeting with officials on both sides of the political divide to try to find a peaceful resolution to the standoff.(AP Photo/Manu Brabo)

Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi wash their hands before "Iftar,"Arabic for breakfast, the dusk meal when observant Muslims break their day-long fast, during a protest near Cairo University in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Egypt's Interior Ministry warned supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Saturday for a second time to abandon their protest encampments as a senior U.S. diplomat was meeting with officials on both sides of the political divide to try to find a peaceful resolution to the standoff. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)

A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi holds a banner with Morsi's image, during a march against Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in the Nasr City section of Cairo on Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)

(AP) ? Egypt's highest security body warned Sunday that the clock is ticking for a peaceful end to the standoff over sit-ins by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, suggesting that authorities will break up the vigils unless mediation efforts produce results soon.

More than a month after the military overthrew Morsi, tens of thousands of the Islamist leader's supporters remain camped out in two main crossroads in Cairo demanding his reinstatement. Egypt's military-backed interim leadership has issued a string of warnings for them to disperse or security forces will move in, setting the stage for a potential bloody showdown.

Also Sunday, authorities announced a court case accusing the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and his powerful deputy of inciting murder will start Aug. 25. Morsi hails from the Brotherhood.

The U.S. and EU are trying to find a peaceful resolution to the standoff to avoid a repeat of violence that has killed more than 250 people ? at least 130 of whom pro-Morsi protesters shot dead by security forces in two clashes ? since the July 3 military coup.

While diplomats raced to find a compromise, the Egyptian interim government signaled that its patience with the pro-Morsi sit-ins was running out.

The National Defense Council, which is led by the interim president and includes top Cabinet ministers, said the search for a peaceful resolution is not open-ended. The council said a negotiated resolution also would not shield from legal proceedings what it called "law-breakers" and others who incite against the state.

It said a chance should be given to all "negotiations and mediations" that could end the protests without bloodshed, but that the timeframe should be "defined and limited." It also called on the protesters to abandon the sit-ins and join the political road map announced the day of Morsi's ouster.

With the Islamist-backed constitution adopted last year suspended and the legislature dominated by Morsi's supporters dissolved, the road map provides for a new or an amended constitution to be put to a national referendum later this year and presidential and parliamentary elections early in 2014

In a move that underlined the government's resolve in dealing with the protests ? now in their second month ? Egyptian authorities on Sunday denied Yemen's Nobel Peace Prize winner Tawakkul Karman entry into Egypt after she landed at Cairo airport on Sunday.

Karman, the first Arab woman to win the Nobel Peace prize, has stated her opposition to Egypt's military coup and said she had intended to join the pro-Morsi sit-in protests.

Airport officials said she was sent back on the Sunday flight that brought her to Cairo from the United Arab Emirates. They did not say why she was denied entry, only that her name had been placed by various security agencies on a stop list at the airport. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media.

The decision to bar Karman suggests authorities wanted to deny the pro-Morsi camp the publicity she would have generated and the idea that prominent figures outside Egypt also oppose Morsi's ouster. Morsi supporters strongly condemned Karman's barring, claiming it was evidence of the "resurrection" of the police state Egypt had under autocrat Hosni Mubarak, toppled in a 2011 popular uprising.

Karman shared the Nobel Peace prize in 2011 with Liberia's President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and women's rights campaigner Leymah Gbowee. She earned it for her role in the protests that swept Yemen in 2011 to force longtime dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh from office.

Pro-Morsi protesters blocked a major road Sunday that runs through most of the city and leads to its international airport.

Meanwhile, U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns extended his visit to Cairo by one day so he can have further talks with Egyptian leaders. He met Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi, who led the coup, on Sunday. A member of the pro-Morsi delegation that met Saturday with Burns said the four delegates also would hold another round of talks with the U.S. diplomat.

Other top diplomats in Cairo are the foreign ministers of the United Arab Emirates, which had been at sharp odds with Morsi's government, and Qatar, which maintains close ties to the Brotherhood. European Union's special envoy, Bernardino Leon, is also in Cairo.

At the core of discussions is the political future of the Muslim Brotherhood and its Islamist allies. The Brotherhood says it is looking for concessions before beginning talks with the military-backed administration. These measures could include releasing detained Brotherhood leaders, unfreezing the group's assets, lifting a ban on Islamist television stations loyal to Morsi and reigning in the use of force against its protesters.

Morsi has been held at undisclosed locations since July 3. He faces accusations of comprising with the militant Palestinian Hamas group to escape prison in 2011. Morsi has been visited by Catherine Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, and a delegation of African statesmen. Ashton reported that he was well and had access to television and newspapers.

Egypt's state news agency said on Sunday that Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie and his deputy Khairat el-Shater are to stand trial Aug. 25 for complicity and incitement in the killing of eight demonstrators outside the group's Cairo headquarters.

Badie is at still large, while el-Shater is in custody.

The killings took place during the first day of the mass street protests calling for Morsi's ouster. The agency also said that senior Brotherhood figure Rashad Bayoumi will face trial on the same charges. Three others face murder charges in the same case.

Morsi's palace aides Rifaah el-Tahtawi and Asaad el-Sheikha meanwhile faced questions over allegations they illegally held and tortured anti-Morsi protesters last Dec. 5 after supporters of the ousted leader descended upon a group of unarmed demonstrators camped outside the presidential palace. Clashes lasting all day left at least 10 dead and hundreds injured.

Both el-Tahtawi and el-Sheikha are in detention.

Associated Press

Source: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-08-04-ML-Egypt/id-0ab64abc4a3c4206b633f5a08b4e6d1f

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Ramos welcomes chance to go beyond bad-guy roles

This photo released by ABC Television shsows"Lucky 7"star Luis Antonio Ramos addressingthe press at Disney | ABC Television Group's Summer Press Tour. (AP Photo/ABC, Todd Wawrychuk)

This photo released by ABC Television shsows"Lucky 7"star Luis Antonio Ramos addressingthe press at Disney | ABC Television Group's Summer Press Tour. (AP Photo/ABC, Todd Wawrychuk)

(AP) ? Luis Antonio Ramos, starring in the new ABC series "Lucky 7," became emotional talking about the chance to play something other than a stereotypical Latino character.

"I was tired of playing bad guys and stabbing people in the neck," Ramos said Sunday.

Such work was "sucking away my soul," forcing him to leave Los Angeles and seek more satisfying parts, including on stage, he told a Television Critics Association session.

In "Lucky 7," Ramos' character works at a gas station in Queens, N.Y., and is a devoted family man. The series follows the impact that a shared lottery win has on the station's employees.

"That's the lottery for me," Ramos said of his character, choking up as he discussed the issue.

Civil rights groups and others have long criticized Hollywood for failing to reflect American diversity and for showing minorities in a limited light. Latinos often have been relegated to gang members or marginalized as domestic workers on TV series.

The ensemble cast of "Lucky 7," which debuts Sept. 24, includes Matt Long, Anastasia Phillips and Isiah Whitlock Jr. It's based on a British series, "The Syndicate," and includes that show's Lorraine Bruce.

Ramos lauded the U.S. series for putting working-class people in the spotlight.

"At the end of the day, that's what America's about. It's about the 99 percent and how they get through the day," he said.

The Puerto Rican-born Ramos has a full resume, with a long list of credits that include TV's "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "Burn Notice," the films "Do the Right Thing" and "Sea of Love," and award-winning stage work.

Associated Press

Source: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/4e67281c3f754d0696fbfdee0f3f1469/Article_2013-08-04-US-TV-Luis-Antonio-Ramos/id-955ff29af2e04321b38c1fd3fb22914d

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Scientists decipher structure of NatA,an enzyme complex that modifies most human proteins

[unable to retrieve full-text content]Scientists have determined the structure of NatA, an enzyme complex that modifies one end of most human proteins and is made at elevated levels in numerous forms of cancer. Their findings, they believe, will allow them to create an inhibitor -- a potential drug -- that could knock out NatA in order to curb the growth of cancer cells.

Source: http://feeds.sciencedaily.com/~r/sciencedaily/top_news/~3/dJhEORJ4eVs/130804144521.htm

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Sunday, August 4, 2013

Shazam (for Windows Phone)


Shazam may have lost some of its 'ooh' factor, but it's still devilishly useful if you don't know what that cool song they're playing is. When the app was first released for iPhone, it was a must-download, if for nothing else than its effectiveness as a party trick. The Windows Phone version was updated last June, and while sharing the strengths and limitations of every Shazam app version, it offers some Windows Phone specific capabilities. But Shazam is not without competition on the platform: Not only can you try the similar SoundHound app, but the built-in Bing search feature in Windows Phone has a microphone feature that listens for ambient music and identifies it for you. So let's take Shazam out for a spin and see whether you really need it.

Setup
Shazam is a free download from the Windows Phone store; a premium version, Shazam Encore costs $5.99, but at this point the free version shows no ads like those on iPhone Shazam, so I can't see any reason to get the paid app. I've asked the company to elucidate the advantages of Encore, and will update this when I hear back.

I tested the app on a Nokia Lumia928. Like so many mobile apps, Shazam's setup wants access to your location, and, though this seems irrelevant for a music app, it does enable a feature that lets you know what people nearby are Shazam-ing. On first run, you have to accept the user agreement; it's the standard boilerplate that the company is creating a profile on you based on your listening habits.?

乳色吐息
Shazam's store description boasts that the app has a "glorious new UI" for Windows Phone 8. At first glance, it's really the most basic interface you can imagine: Just a single big button saying "tag now." As with most windows apps, you swipe sideways to get to different pages. After the Tag Now page, these include pages for your recent tags, chart, and local tags. The app's live tile lets you see album art for your last tag, and you can make another live tile for Tag Now, so you can immediately start song recognition. Finally, among interface goodies is the ability to use the album art of your last-viewed tag as the phone's lock screen background.

Tagging Tunes
I tested the app with increasingly challenging music. Shazam refers to the act of identifying a song "tagging." The app expectedly had no trouble at all tagging the likes of Katy Perry playing at an outdoor Japanese restaurant. Then I headed to Starbucks, where the Art Garfunkel tune playing was no challenge for Shazam, either. The less mass-market Peter Tosh's Rudies Melody was found, too.

But when I headed to an independent coffee shop, things got dicier: The app was unable to identify anything on the hipster baristas' playlist. I held the phone up to the speaker, and I didn't' think the ambient noise was louder than the restaurant and Starbucks, but that might have been a factor in its inability to find the songs. Nor was the app able to identify a song playing on SomaFM, Terre Thaemiz's Hovering Glows or even M-Seven's Contained.

On the classical front, it had more success, identifying the Jasper String Quartet, the wonderful choral group Stile Antico, and even The Harp Consort's Spanish Dances. In all, though, Shazam was far better at identifying music than its nearest competitor, SoundHound, which didn't recognize the harp music or the string quartet.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ziffdavis/pcmag/~3/h5_6FIGweSE/0,2817,2422614,00.asp

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Egyptian forces to cordon off protest sites

CAIRO (AP) ? Authorities outlined plans Friday to break up two sit-ins by supporters of deposed President Mohammed Morsi, saying they would set up a cordon around the protest sites, and riot police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators threatening a TV complex.

Morsi backers also showed their defiance by briefly setting up a third camp near the airport, but later folded their tents and left.

The military-backed interim government seeks to end a political stalemate that has paralyzed Egypt and deeply divided the country. Supporters of Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood say they will not disperse until he is returned to power.

The second-ranking U.S. diplomat arrived in the Egyptian capital for talks on the political crisis, as Secretary of State John Kerry warned both sides that "the last thing we want is more violence."

Also Friday, Amnesty International reported cases of alleged killings and torture at the hands of Morsi supporters inside the protest camps, saying that one man had his throat cut and another was stabbed to death.

In southwestern Cairo, police fired tear gas at Morsi supporters who rallied in front of Media City, a site housing most of Egypt's private TV stations, a security official said. A second official told the state news agency that protesters tried to "obstruct traffic in an attempt to affect work at the complex."

The rally was "a desperate attempt by rioters from the (Islamist) current," Maj. Gen. Abdel-Fattah Othman, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry, told the private TV station Mehwer. "There was reinforcement from police and army that will not allow any reckless person to get close to the Media City or storm it."

He described the protesters as "brainwashed" to attack broadcasters perceived as secular opponents of the Islamists. Last year, Morsi supporters held a sit-in near Media City, often harassing TV personalities and forcing many of them to sneak into the studios from other entrances.

Demonstrators said they gathered there to protest the lack of local media coverage of their activities, and insisted their gathering was peaceful. Health ministry official Khaled el-Khateeb said 23 people were injured in the clashes; and security officials said two conscripts were also wounded, including one with birdshot.

The security officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not allowed to address the media, said 31 rioters were detained following the clashes. Footage of the detainees sitting on the ground outside the media city was aired on private channels.

The new unrest came as state-controlled TV reported that security forces will establish a cordon within 48 hours around the two main protest sites in Cairo where thousands have been camped out since before Morsi was ousted by the military on July 3.

The government offered protection and "safe passage" to those willing to leave the two main camps ? a large one outside the Rabaah al-Adawiya Mosque in eastern Cairo and a smaller one near Cairo University's main campus in Giza. The leadership had earlier given orders to police to end what it described as "threat to national security" and sources of "citizens' terrorism."

Authorities will let people leave without checking their identities or arresting them, but they will not allow anyone into the protest camps, the report said. It did not elaborate on the next steps, but the government earlier said it will use water cannons and tear gas in dispersing the crowds.

The Morsi supporters are also planning rallies late Friday outside security headquarters near one sit-in site, including the Republican Guard club, where they had staged a protest that turned bloody last month, and another army building.

The security cordon around the protest camps raises the possibility of new violence, which has killed more than 130 Morsi supporters and injured hundreds since the military coup. The ouster followed mass demonstrations calling for Morsi to step down after a year in office, saying his policies had failed and he had put power in the hands of his Islamist group.

Facing domestic and international pressure to avoid bloodshed, authorities have taken the unusual step of going into details of its security plans.

Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim told a newspaper that police have finalized plans for breaking up the sit-ins, and were awaiting orders from prosecutors to start the second phase of its operation.

Police have given authorities information about weapons in the protest camps and the "dangers emanating" from there, and that the next phase of the plan, which includes surrounding the sites, would begin within hours, he was quoted as saying.

"The forces have established their presence in various areas with the aim of protecting security and stability," Ibrahim said, adding that the ministry was awaiting legal action from the prosecutors. He said a prosecution team will accompany the security forces to monitor how they deal with the protesters.

Ibrahim told the newspaper that he was awaiting approval from the National Defense Council on measures relating to the final phase of the operation, which would be the use of force while trying not to injure anyone.

The Amnesty International report quoted a survivor of an attack by Morsi supporters near the Cairo University sit-in as saying that he saw one bloodied man have his throat cut and another stabbed to death.

The report also cited accounts from survivors that Morsi backers also abducted and tortured their political opponents with beatings and electric shocks at or near the protest sites.

The Interior Ministry last weekend had said 11 bodies were found near one of the protest sites, with some showing signs of torture, apparently by members of the sit-ins who believed the victims were spies.

Near the Rabaah protest camp, people armed with sticks and makeshift body armor stood guard behind walls of sandbags, tires and bricks.

One speaker defiantly told the crowd that the military leader, Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi, appeared reluctant to carry out his promise to break up the sit-ins.

"This man is about to fall now in the face of all these retractions," the speaker said to thousands of people who gathered for a meal to break their daytime fast for the holy month of Ramadan.

Ahmed Madani, 26, was installing a new tent at one of the camp entrances, saying the facilities will have a kitchen and toilets.

"We are here to show them that we are determined to stay and we won't give up," he said. "Even if I have to die, I will not leave. We are thousands ready to die for our cause."

The pro-Morsi camps have disrupted daily life in Cairo, blocking traffic and antagonizing some residents already suffering under Egypt's economic woes.

"A peaceful sit-in does not block roads, it doesn't terrorize people, it does not kill people and it does not attack people," said Wahid Idris, an opponent of the Muslim Brotherhood. "I want them to use any means to put an end to that sit-in."

In addition to the smaller sit-in across town, a new vigil sprung up briefly near Cairo's international airport, on the outskirts of the suburb of Heliopolis, in a neighborhood known as "The Thousand Houses."

An Associated Press reporter saw thousands of protesters, many of them are families and women in conservative Muslim dress, occupying a square and laying prayer rugs on the asphalt. They raised banners with Morsi's portrait saying, "Down with military rule," waved Egyptian flags and chanted, "Go away Sissi! Morsi is my president."

About six hours later, however, the camp was dismantled because organizers believed it to be insecure, said Adel Hassan, a protester who folded his tent.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns arrived in Cairo, and an Egyptian Foreign Ministry official said he would meet with interim leadership officials and representatives from the Muslim Brotherhood and its allies Saturday.

Amr Darag, one of the Brotherhood negotiators who will meet with Burns, told the AP that the group and its allies are looking for "confidence-building measures" in order for them to sit at the table with their rivals.

Such measures include releasing detained Brotherhood leaders, unfreezing the group's assets, lifting the ban on its TV stations and ending violence against its protests. Darag said the group can't order its protesters to go home because they are fighting for their rights and the reinstatement of Morsi as president.

It was unclear if Burns would see Morsi during his second visit to Cairo since the coup. On Monday, top European Union diplomat Catherine Ashton saw Morsi for two hours at the facility where he is being held by the military. An African Union delegation also briefly met the ousted president a day later.

In London, Kerry sought to clarify controversial remarks he made Thursday about the crisis when he told Geo TV in Pakistan that the Egyptian military was "restoring democracy."

The comment was seen by some as a signal the U.S. was siding with the military, even though the State Department has repeatedly said the U.S. is not taking sides.

Kerry said Friday that all parties ? the military as well as the Morsi supporters ? should be inclusive and work toward a peaceful resolution of the crisis.

"The last thing that we want is more violence," he said. "The temporary government has a responsibility with respect to demonstrators to give them the space to be able to demonstrate in peace. But at the same time, the demonstrators have a responsibility not to stop everything from proceeding in Egypt."

A spokesman of Egypt's Mulim Brotherhood, Gehad el-Haddad, denounced Kerry's remarks, asking if Kerry would similarly approve of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel deposing President Barack Obama if large protests took place in the United States.

Rights groups have warned against using force to end the protests. The New York-based Human Rights Watch urged the interim leadership to take all measures to avert bloodshed.

"To avoid another bloodbath, Egypt's civilian rulers need to ensure the ongoing right of protesters to assemble peacefully, and seek alternatives to a forcible dispersal of the crowds," said Nadim Houry, deputy director of the Middle East and North Africa division of Human Rights Watch.

The Muslim Brotherhood has opposed all measures taken by the military since the coup, including the appointment of an interim president, the suspension the constitution and the disbanding of the Islamist-dominated legislative council.

___

Associated Press writer Tony G. Gabriel contributed to this report.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/egyptian-forces-cordon-off-protest-sites-214455709.html

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An Illustrated History of the Hovercraft

An Illustrated History of the Hovercraft

If you've ever wanted to master English by using the phrase "My hovercraft is full of eels," then it's time you learned about the history of the strange vehicle known as the hovercraft. Here is a photographic history of this legendary piece of technology.

Read more...

Source: http://io9.com/an-illustrated-history-of-the-hovercraft-998911698

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